Story-Boarding for Animation

You are welcome to download this presentation (click on the "view on slideshare" link on the presentation below. Once you arrive at slideshare.net click on the "download tab that appears above the presentation) and use it in your classroom.


Instructor: Amy Johnson

Grade Level: Middle Ages 6th-8th

Media: 8 x 10 white construction paper, pencils, permanent pens, colored markers

Time: 1-2 hour long session(s)

Objectives:
TLW define storyboarding.
TLW choose an emotion and develop this emotion into a story
TLW illustrate a story based on their own emotions using a storyboard

Procedure:
Step 1: The teacher will acknowledge the class is beginning a second lesson in animation. S/he will lead the class in a review discussion of their previous lessons. S/he will encourage the students to self-identify previous vocabulary words including “animation,” and “thaumatrope.” S/he will introduce the next lesson by stating that the class is going to explore how artists think about telling a story using animation.

Step 2: The teacher will ask students to think about their favorite cartoons. S/he will ask them to think about if the cartoon is always up close to the cartoon characters or if it is far away, or if it is a mixture of both. S/he will ask if the cartoon has noise like voices talking and/or music. The teacher will ask students to think about how their favorite cartoon shows the characters emotions such as happiness or sadness. The teacher will open the floor to students to discuss the different ways in which their favorite cartoon shows the characters. The teacher will discuss how animation artists think about using music, sound, and special effects like close ups etc. to make cartoons more special.

Step 3: The teacher will tell the students that s/he is going to show them a clip from a cartoon. S/he will ask them to think inside their heads about what the class has just discussed with regards to sound, music, facial expression, close ups and far shots. S/he will ask them to be ready to tell them what they noticed about the cartoon once the cartoon is finished.

Step 4: The teacher will show the trailer from Spirited Away http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6az9wGfeSgM

Step 5: Once the clip is finished the teacher will ask students to respond. The teacher should feel free to show the video again etc. if necessary. The teacher will ask students if they think the artists who created the cartoon thought ahead of time about music, sound, facial expressions, close ups and far shots. S/he will tell them that most artists do think about these things ahead of time and plan them out on something called a “story board.” The teacher will ask students what order they think that the artists for Spirited Away put items in their storyboard. The teacher will define “storyboard.”

Step 6: The teacher will ask students what order they think that the artists for Spirited Away put items in their storyboard. The teacher, using an overhead projector, will put the items the students cite into the storyboard. S/he will demonstrate the ways in which small figures can be utilized to tell a story.

Step 7: The teacher will hand each student a copy of the Middle Storyboard Worksheet by Amy Johnson (included in the CD). The worksheet asks students to pick their favorite book, and then it prompts them to use the storyboard to block out their favorite scene from the book as if they were going to turn it into a movie. The teacher will ask students to gain approval from the teacher after they have chosen their book and their scene.

Step 8: Students are given the balance of time to create and color their own storyboards.

Materials:
-8.5 in x 11 in paper
-pencils
-erasers
-markers
-colored pencils

Vocabulary:
Storyboard A panel or series of panels of rough sketches, like those in a comic strip, outlining the scene sequence and major changes of action or plot in a production to be shot on film or video..

Technology
-DLP Projector
-Computer
-Overhead Projector
-Power-Point
-Worksheet “Elementary Storyboard Worksheet.”

Accommodations/Modifications:
The Power-Point for this lesson features active .gif file animations that create flashing. This is a SERIOUS health hazard for students with epilepsy. Be aware for of any students you have with epilepsy and/or any students who show signs of reacting poorly physically to the flashing. Should your classroom have students with epilepsy: Delete the flashing imagery in the Power-Point and instead show the students actual exemplars of the animations. Follow the instructions and goals of the students’ IEP. For students who need more structure/rules, take the time to have some independent instruction with them. Have the student mimic the technique back to you, so you can assure mastery

Interdisciplinary/Cultural Connections:
1. Ask students to infer why storyboards are used to organize films.
2. Ask students if they can think of any other ways in which something like a storyboard is used to tell a story
-comic strips
-graphic novels

Evaluation/Assessment:

CATEGORY
4
3
2
1
Neatness
SB is neatly drawn and inked in pen with no stray marks. Written information is easy to read.
SB is neatly drawn and inked in pen with few stray marks or written information is slightly difficult to read.
SB isn't neatly drawn and/or isn't inked and/or written information is difficult to read.
SB isn't neatly drawn, there are many stray marks, and the writing is difficult to read.
Creativity
SB demonstrates several different points of views, there are notations about sounds and music as they .
SB demonstrates a few different points of views, there are some notations about sound and music as they relate.
SB doesn't demonstrate multiple points of view. There are few if any notations about sound and music as they relate.
SB demonstrates only one point of view, there are no notation for sound or music.
Guidelines
SB illustrates an age appropriate book choice and an interesting scene choice.
SB illustrates an age appropriate book choice and a mostly interesting scene choice.
SB doesn't illustrate an age appropriate book or doesn't depict an interesting scene choice.
SB doesn't illustrate an age appropriate book and doesn't depict an interesting scene choice.
Finishing
SB is thoughtfully colored in, SB is finished completely, rubric was completed and all materials were turned in to appropriate places.
SB is thoughtfully colored in, SB may not have been finished on time, rubric may not have been fully completed and all materials were turned in to appropriate places.
SB isn't thoughtfully colored in, isn't finished on time, rubric is only partially completed.
SB isn't thoughtfully colored in, isn't finished on time, rubric is not completed.


Middle_Storyboarding_Worksheet.jpg




High_School_Storyboard_Worksheet.jpg